Tracker


A young hunter must confront the value of life as he faces the loss of his grandfather.For John Borne’s family, hunting has nothing to do with sport or manliness. It’s a matter of survival. Every fall John and his grandfather go off into the woods to shoot the deer that puts meat on the table over the long Minnesota winter. But this year John’s grandfather is dying, and John must hunt alone. John tracks a doe for two days, but as he closes in on his prey, he realizes he cannot shoot her. For John, the hunt is no longer about killing, but about life.

Tent


Teenage Steven and his father, Corey, take to the road with a Bible, an old army tent, and less than the best of intentions. Tired of being poor, Steven’s father is certain that preaching the Word of the Lord is the easy way to fame and fortune. But just when they’ve got their act down pat and the money is rolling in, Steven and Corey begin to realize that what they’d originally thought of as aharmless lieis all about avarice and power and, ultimately, guilt. Each book includes a reader’s guide.

Harris and Me


A young boy spends his tenth summer on his aunt and uncles farm, where he is constantly involved in crazy escapades with his cousin Harris. On the Larson farm, readers will experience hearts as large as farmers appetites, humor as broad as the country landscape and adventures as wild as boyhood imaginations. All this adds up to a hearty helping of old-fashioned, rip-roaring entertainment.—Publishers Weekly

Puppies, Dogs, and Blue Northers


An experienced Iditarod racer, Gary Paulsen celebrates his lead dog and longtime companion, Cookie, in this intimate essay. Paulsen takes readers inside the kennel as Cookies last litter of pups grow and learn to pull sleds across the snowy frontier. Includes an author’s note.

River


We want you to do it again.These words, spoken to Brian Robeson, will change his life. Two years earlier, Brian was stranded alone in the wilderness for 54 days with nothing but a small hatchet. Yet he survived.Now the government wants him to go back into the wilderness so that astronauts and the military can learn the survival techniques that kept Brian alive. Soon the project backfires, though, leaving Brian with a wounded partner and a long river to navigate. His only hope is to build a raft and try to transport the injured man a hundred miles downstream to a trading post—if the map he has is accurate.From the Paperback edition.

Brian’s Winter


In Hatchet, 13-year-old Brian Robeson learned to survive alone in the Canadian wilderness, armed only with his hatchet. Finally, as millions of readers know, he was rescued at the end of the summer. But what if Brian hadn’t been rescued? What if he had been left to face his deadliest enemy—winter?Gary Paulsen raises the stakes for survival in this riveting and inspiring story as one boy confronts the ultimate test and the ultimate adventure.From the Paperback edition.

Family Ties


Family fun takes center stage in three-time Newbery Honor winner Gary Paulsen’s hilarious novel for middle-school boys. Kevin Spencer is the glue that holds his family together. When his wacky relatives decide to have a double wedding in the backyard, Kevin takes charge. Planning two weddings is a great way to impress his girlfriend, Tina Zabinski, the Most Beautiful and Best-Smelling Girl in the World.But as more and more relatives come to stay, things spiral out of control. Tying the knot has Kevin tied up in knots in this laugh-out-loud story.’;When it comes to telling funny stories about boys, no one surpasses Paulsen.’Booklist’;[Paulsen is] one of the best-loved writers alive.’The New York TimesPraise for Family Ties’;Kevin seems to truly have his heart in the right place as he tries to bring order to the disparate parts [of his family] and restore some missing familial affection.’Kirkus Reviews’;The Spencers may not be a conventionally perfect family, but by the end of the novel it is clear that, despite their oddball antics, they are a loving one. Fans of the series and new readers will enjoy this offering.’School Library Journal’;[A] goofy, rollicking ride.’The Bulletin of the Center for Children’s BooksFrom the Hardcover edition.

Liar, Liar


Kevin doesn’t mean to make trouble when he lies. He’s just really good at it, and it makes life so much easier. But as his lies pile up, he finds himself in bigand funnytrouble with his friends, family, and teachers. He’s got to find a way toend his lying streakforever.From the Hardcover edition.

Masters of Disaster


‘;Let’s face facts: We may be the most boring twelve-year-olds on the planet.’Henry Mosley decides that he and his pals Riley and Reed have got to liven things up. They need to go on some earth-shaking adventures and make a name for themselves. Henry is the mastermind; Riley’s the cautious researcher who’s prepared for anything. And somehow fearful Reed always ends up with the scariest, craziest assignments. Roped into wacky attempts to break world records, reenact scenes from books, solve a hundred-year-old murder, and carry out Henry’s other inspired ideas, Riley and Reed follow their fearless leader everywhere: into the wilderness (truly terrifying), inside a bull-riding ring, into a haunted house, off the neighbors’ roof, and into a cataclysmic collision with explosive life-forms. Gary Paulsen brings all his trademark humor to this fast-paced novel of fun and disaster.From the Hardcover edition.

Paintings from the Cave


Meet Jake who lives in a neighborhood controlled by street violence and fear. He meets a sculptor across the street, and his eyes are opened to another world. Or Jojo,who’s closer to her three dogs than to her foster family. When Jojo tries to help another girl who needs a friend, the dogs know what to do. Or Jamie, Erik, and Grandpa, who make up an unusual family.From the Hardcover edition.