10-Lb Penalty


A classic mystery from Dick Francis, the champion of English storytellers. Seventeen-year-old Benedict Juliard’s ambitions of becoming a steeplechase jockey are dashed when he’s falsely accused of taking drugs. For his estranged father, however, this is an opportunity. A wealthy businessman running for a parliamentary by-election in Dorset, Juliard Senior needs all the help he can get — especially when the campaign moves from mudslinging to something more deadly. Now young Benedict has to grow up fast, not only to find out who is trying to harm his father’s chances of election but also to keep him alive long enough to stay in the race… Praise for Dick Francis: ‘As a jockey, Dick Francis was unbeatable when he got into his stride. The same is true of his crime writing’ Daily Mirror ‘Dick Francis’s fiction has a secret ingredient — his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader’s attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end’ Sunday Telegraph ‘The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish’ Scotsman ‘Francis writing at his best’ Evening Standard ‘A regular winner . . . as smooth, swift and lean as ever’ Sunday Express ‘A super chiller and killer’ New York Times Book ReviewDick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott. During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers’ Association’s Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three ‘best novel’ Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime’s achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List of 2000. Dick Francis died in February 2010, at the age of eighty-nine, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

To The Hilt


A classic mystery from Dick Francis, the champion of English storytellers. Just after learning that his stepfather is gravely ill, artist Al Kinloch, returning to his remote home in the Scottish Highlands, is attacked by four men. They ask one question — ‘where is it?’ — then leave him for dead. Baffled and hurt, Al visits his stepfather and learns millions of pounds are missing and a valuable racehorse is under threat. Roughed up already, Al decides he has nothing to lose getting to the bottom of this. Unfortunately, the thugs who beat him up and the person behind them will make sure that Al doesn’t survive their next encounter… Praise for Dick Francis: ‘As a jockey, Dick Francis was unbeatable when he got into his stride. The same is true of his crime writing’ Daily Mirror ‘Dick Francis’s fiction has a secret ingredient — his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader’s attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end’ Sunday Telegraph ‘The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish’ Scotsman ‘Francis writing at his best’ Evening Standard’A regular winner . . . as smooth, swift and lean as ever’ Sunday Express ‘A super chiller and killer’ New York Times Book Review Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott. During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers’ Association’s Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three ‘best novel’ Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime’s achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List of 2000. Dick Francis died in February 2010, at the age of eighty-nine, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

Flying Finish


Flying Finish is a classic novel from Dick Francis, one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.Amateur jockey Lord Henry Grey decides on a whim to join the bloodstock market, transporting racehorses around the world. And when he meets the glamorous Gabriella in Italy, he is sure he’s hit the good life.That is, until a horse unexpectedly dies in transit and a colleague vanishes.Then Grey discovers that both his predecessors also went missing in curious cirmcumstances — and begins to doubt the wisdom of his career change.Either he turns detective or his own disappearance could be next . . .Packed with intrigue and hair-raising suspense, Flying Finish is just one of the many blockbuster thrillers from legendary crime writer Dick Francis. Other novels include the huge bestsellers Dead Heat, Under Orders and Silks. The Dick Francis legacy continues through his son Felix Francis: Refusal is his latest novel, following Bloodline and Gamble.Praise for the Dick Francis novels:’The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish’ Scotsman’Dick Francis’s fiction has a secret ingredient — his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader’s attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end’ Sunday Telegraph’Still the master’ Racing Post’The master of suspense and intrigue’ Country LifeDick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott. Dick Francis died in February, 2010, at the age of 89, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

Blood Sport


A classic mystery from Dick Francis, the champion of English storytellers. Gene Hawkins is a fixer for his boss Mr Keeble: if Keeble has a problem, Gene goes and fixes it. It’s that simple. Sometimes it requires the Luger he carries — mostly it doesn’t. Now Keeble has summoned Gene back from a long-overdue holiday. It seems that a very expensive stallion has been taken in Kentucky. It’s the third high-value kidnapping in a few years. Keeble wants his horse back. Gene is asked to go out there and find it. But what Gene doesn’t know is that he’s about to get involved with blackmailers and murderers. Looks like that Lugar will see some use…Praise for Dick Francis: ‘As a jockey, Dick Francis was unbeatable when he got into his stride. The same is true of his crime writing’ Daily Mirror’Dick Francis’s fiction has a secret ingredient — his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader’s attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end’ Sunday Telegraph’The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish’ Scotsman ‘Francis writing at his best’ Evening Standard’A regular winner . . . as smooth, swift and lean as ever’ Sunday Express ‘A super chiller and killer’ New York Times Book Review Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott. During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers’ Association’s Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three ‘best novel’ Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime’s achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List of 2000. Dick Francis died in February 2010, at the age of eighty-nine, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

Longshot


A classic mystery from Dick Francis, the champion of English storytellers. Life as a writer is colder, hungrier work than John Kendall had bargained for. Not even the survival guides he’s written can help him. So when notorious racehorse trainer Tremayne Vickers approaches Kendall to write his biography, it’s an offer the impoverished writer can’t turn down. Moving into Vickers’ country home, Kendall quickly becomes immersed in his host’s lifestyle: riding racehorses, making friends, and getting to know the family. But then a local stable girl is found dead — and the party’s over. A killer is lurking in the shadows. And Kendall’s own survival tips are about to become more useful — and more deadly — than he could ever have imagined . . . Praise for Dick Francis: ‘As a jockey, Dick Francis was unbeatable when he got into his stride. The same is true of his crime writing’ Daily Mirror ‘Dick Francis’s fiction has a secret ingredient — his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader’s attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end’ Sunday Telegraph ‘The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish’ Scotsman ‘Francis writing at his best’ Evening Standard’A regular winner . . . as smooth, swift and lean as ever’ Sunday Express Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott. During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers’ Association’s Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three ‘best novel’ Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime’s achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List of 2000. Dick Francis died in February 2010, at the age of eighty-nine, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

Forfeit


A classic mystery from Dick Francis, the champion of English storytellers. Bert Checkov, a racing correspondent, drunkenly confesses to fellow Fleet Street hack James Tyrone that he’s been giving his readers bum tips for years. Five minutes later, Checkov’s fallen out a seventh floor window.Tyrone has a nose for a story and he’s convinced there’s more to his friend’s death than meets the eye. When he starts digging, he discovers that many of Checkov’s tips never even made it to the start.But the deeper Tyrone gets, the dirtier and more dangerous this business appears to be. If he’s not careful he’ll be following Checkov to his death…Praise for Dick Francis: ‘As a jockey, Dick Francis was unbeatable when he got into his stride. The same is true of his crime writing’ Daily Mirror ‘Dick Francis’s fiction has a secret ingredient — his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader’s attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end’ Sunday Telegraph ‘The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish’ Scotsman ‘Francis writing at his best’ Evening Standard ‘A regular winner . . . as smooth, swift and lean as ever’ Sunday Express ‘A super chiller and killer’ New York Times Book Review Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott. During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers’ Association’s Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three ‘best novel’ Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime’s achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List of 2000. Dick Francis died in February 2010, at the age of eighty-nine, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

Comeback


A classic mystery from Dick Francis, the champion of English storytellers. Foreign Office diplomat Peter Darwin is returning to England, back to his childhood home of Gloucestershire. But instead of a pleasant trip down memory lane, Peter finds himself coming to the aid of a veterinary surgeon whose operating theatre is rapidly turning into an abattoir. In fact a string of valuable racehorses have suffered unexplained deaths, and the police are baffled. When Darwin looks into the mystery he finds that his connections — and his memories — help him uncover criminal activities that stretch back all the way to his childhood. But the more Darwin uncovers, the closer he gets to a killer who just can’t stop… Praise for Dick Francis: ‘As a jockey, Dick Francis was unbeatable when he got into his stride. The same is true of his crime writing’ Daily Mirror ‘Dick Francis’s fiction has a secret ingredient — his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader’s attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end’ Sunday Telegraph’The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish’ Scotsman’Francis writing at his best’ Evening Standard ‘A regular winner . . . as smooth, swift and lean as ever’ Sunday Express ‘A super chiller and killer’ New York Times Book ReviewDick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott.During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers’ Association’s Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three ‘best novel’ Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime’s achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List of 2000. Dick Francis died in February 2010, at the age of eighty-nine, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

Risk


A classic mystery from Dick Francis, the champion of English storytellers. As an amateur jockey, Roland Britten was lucky, and as an accountant he was rigorous. He knew he was on the hate list of several fraudsters, but never thought pen-pushers got kidnapped. And not from a racecourse right after beating the odds to win the Cheltenham Gold Cup. Held prisoner, Britten has no idea who his kidnappers are nor why they have abducted him. Only when resourceful school headmistress Hilary Pinlock gives him the opportunity to escape is he able to seriously think about what has happened and turn his logical mind to track down his abductors. But his kidnappers haven’t finished with him yet — and they’ll risk anything to get hold of him once again . . . Praise for Dick Francis: ‘As a jockey, Dick Francis was unbeatable when he got into his stride. The same is true of his crime writing’ Daily Mirror ‘Dick Francis’s fiction has a secret ingredient — his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader’s attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end’ Sunday Telegraph ‘The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish’ Scotsman ‘Francis writing at his best’ Evening Standard ‘A regular winner . . . as smooth, swift and lean as ever’ Sunday Express Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott. During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers’ Association’s Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three ‘best novel’ Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime’s achievement. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and was awarded a CBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List of 2000. Dick Francis died in February 2010, at the age of eighty-nine, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

Nerve


Nerve is a classic novel from Dick Francis, one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.Rob Finn’s winning streak made him one of the most sought-after steeplechase jockeys. But his subsequent collapse in form surprised no one more than himself.As word spreads that Finn has lost his nerve, he discovers a well-managed campaign to discredit certain jockeys; in his own case, a plan assisted by horse doping.But to find the culprits behind it, Finn will have to use all his cunning and racing know-how . . .Packed with intrigue and hair-raising suspense, Nerve is just one of the many blockbuster thrillers from legendary crime writer Dick Francis. Other novels include the huge bestsellers Dead Heat, Under Orders and Silks. The Dick Francis legacy continues through his son Felix Francis: Refusal is his latest novel, following Bloodline and Gamble.Praise for the Dick Francis novels:’The narrative is brisk and gripping and the background researched with care . . . the entire story is a pleasure to relish’ Scotsman’Dick Francis’s fiction has a secret ingredient — his inimitable knack of grabbing the reader’s attention on page one and holding it tight until the very end’ Sunday Telegraph’Still the master’ Racing Post’The master of suspense and intrigue’ Country LifeDick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. On his retirement from the saddle, he published his autobiography, The Sport of Queens, before going on to write forty-three bestselling novels, a volume of short stories (Field of 13), and the biography of Lester Piggott. Dick Francis died in February, 2010, at the age of 89, but he remains one of the greatest thriller writers of all time.

Danger


A beautiful Italian girl driving home in an open top sports car, a little boy playing on a south Coast beach and the Senior Steward of the Jockey Club on his way to a press reception in Baltimore. One after the other they suffer the same nightmare ordeal — kidnapping. But there is one thing connecting these particular cases. For the Italian girl is a jockey and the little boy an only son of a race horse owner. A picture of the person behind this interanational chain of crime starts to emerge — a lover of Verdi, a man with a cool and calculating brain and an aficionado of the racing world. Andrew Doublas, brought in to advise and help the vicitms and their families, proceeds with all his customary diplomacy and courage. Only to find himeself playing a dangerous part: the role usually reserved for his clients…