The Complete Stories of Philip K. Dick Vol. 5: The Eye of the Sibyl and Other Classic Stories


Philip K. Dick

The Complete Stories of Philip K. Dick Vol. 5:

The Eye of the Sibyl and Other Classic Stories

Introduction By Thomas M. Disch

The conventional wisdom has it that there are writers’ writers and readers’ writers. The latter are those happy few whose books, by some pheromonic chemistry the former can never quite duplicate in their own laboratories, appear year after year on the best seller lists. They may or (more usually) may not satisfy the up-market tastes of «literary» critics but their books sell. Writers’ writers get great reviews, especially from their admiring colleagues, but their books don’t attract readers, who can recognize, even at the distance of a review, the signs of a book by a writers’ writer. The prose style comes in for high praise (a true readers’ writer, by contrast, would not want to be accused of anything so elitist as «style»); the characters have «depth»; above all, such a book is «serious.»

Many writers’ writers a…

The Complete Stories of Philip K. Dick Vol. 4:


«More than anyone else in the field, Mr. Dick really puts you inside people’s minds.»

– Wall Street Journal

Many thousands of readers worldwide consider Philip K. Dick to have been the greatest science fiction writer on any planet. Since his untimely death in 1982, interest in Dick’s work has continued to mount and his reputation has been enhanced by a growing body of critical attention. The Philip K. Dick Award is now presented annually to a distinguished work of science fiction, and the Philip K. Dick Society is devoted to the study and promulgation of his works.

This collection includes all of the writer’s earliest short and medium-length fiction (including several previously unpublished stories) covering the years 1954-1964, and featuring such fascinating tales as The Minority Report (the inspiration for Steven Spielberg’s film), Service Call, Stand By, The Days of Perky Pat, and many others. Here, readers will find Dick’s initial explorations of the themes he so brilliantly brought to life in his later work.

Dick won the prestigious Hugo Award for best novel of 1963 for The Man in the High Castle and in the last year of his life, the now-classic film Blade Runner was made from his novel Do Androids Dream Electric Sheep?

The classic stories of Philip K. Dick offer an intriguing glimpse into the early imagination of one of science fiction’s most enduring and respected names.

«A useful acquisition for any serious SF library or collection.» – Kirkus Reviews

«Awe-inspiring.» – The Washington Post

The Complete Stories of Philip K. Dick Vol. 2


«A fitting tribute to a great philosophical writer who found science fiction the ideal form tor the expression of his ideas.»

– The Independent

Second Variety is the third in a massive five-volume collection of the complete shorter fiction of the 20th Century’s greatest SF author – Philip K. Dick. It brings together 27 stories and includes such masterpieces as the title story, with its endless war being fought by ever more cunning and sophisticated robot weapons; «Impostor», in which a man is accused of being an alien spy and finds his whole identity called into question; and «Prominent Author», in which a fracture in space/time enables an ordinary future commuter to achieve unexpected literary fame.

Again and again in these stories – written and published while America was in the grip of McCarthyism – Dick speaks up for ordinary people and against militarism, paranoia and xenophobia. But first and foremost these are marvellously varied and entertaining stories from a writer who overflowed with ideas.

«One of the most original practitioners writing any kind of fiction.» – Sunday Times

«An elusive and incomparable artist.» – Ursula LeGuin

«The most consistantly brilliant SF writer in the world… author of more good short stories than I can count.» – John Brunner

We Can Remember It for You Wholesale


“We Can Remember It for You Wholesale”

by Philip K. Dick

He awoke—and wanted Mars. The valleys, he thought. What would it be like to trudge among them? Great and greater yet: the dream grew as he became fully conscious, the dream and the yearning. He could almost feel the enveloping presence of the other world, which only Government agents and high officials had seen. A clerk like himself? Not likely.

“Are you getting up or not?” his wife Kirsten asked drowsily, with her usual hint of fierce crossness. “If you are, push the hot coffee button on the darn stove.”

“Okay,” Douglas Quail said, and made his way barefoot from the bedroom of their conapt to the kitchen. There, having dutifully pressed the hot coffee button, he seated himself at the kitchen table, brought out a yellow, small tin of fine Dean Swift snuff. He inhaled briskly, and the Beau Nash mixture stung his nose, burned the roof of his mouth. But still he inhaled; it woke him up and allowed his dr…

The Short Happy Life of the Brown Oxford and Other Classic Stories


This collection includes all of the writer’s earliest short and medium-length fiction (including some previously unpublished stories) covering the years 1952-1955. These fascinating stories include “Beyond Lies the Wub”, “The Short Happy Life of the Brown Oxford”, “The Variable Man”, and 22 others.

The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories


Many thousands of readers consider Philip K. Dick the greatest science fiction mind on any planet. Since his untimely death in 1982, interest in Dick’s works has continued to mount and his reputation has been further enhanced by a growing body of critical attention. The Philip K. Dick Award is now given annually to a distinguished work of science fiction, and the Philip K. Dick Society is devoted to the study and promulgation of his works.

This collection includes all of the writer’s earliest short and medium-length fiction (including some previously unpublished stories) covering the years 1954-1964. These fascinating stories include “Service Call”, “Stand By”, “The Days of Perky Pat”, and many others.

The Man in the High Castle


The Hugo Award Winner-1963

It’s America in 1962. Slavery is legal once again. The few Jews who still survive hide under assumed names. In San Francisco the I Ching is as common as the Yellow Pages. All because some 20 years earlier the United States lost a war—and is now occupied jointly by Nazi Germany and Japan.

This harrowing, Hugo Award-winning novel is the work that established Philip K. Dick as an innovator in science fiction while breaking the barrier between science fiction and the serious novel of ideas. In it Dick offers a haunting vision of history as a nightmare from which it may just be possible to awake.

The Hanging Stranger


The Hanging Stranger

by Philip K. Dick

At five o’clock Ed Loyce washed up, tossed on his hat and coat, got his car out and headed across town toward his TV sales store. He was tired. His back and shoulders ached from digging dirt out of the basement and wheeling it into the back yard. But for a forty-year-old man he had done okay. Janet could get a new vase with the money he had saved; and he liked the idea of repairing the foundations himself.

It was getting dark. The setting sun cast long rays over the scurrying commuters, tired and grim-faced, women loaded down with bundles and packages, students, swarming home from the university, mixing with clerks and businessmen and drab secretaries. He stopped his Packard for a red light and then started it up again. The store had been open without him; he’d arrive just in time to spell the help for dinner, go over the records of the day, maybe even close a couple of sales himself. He drove slowly past the small square of g…